Black Music Mattered: Demystifying Segregation, Integration and the Sounds of Soul

John Capouya, Associate Professor of journalism and writing at the University of Tampa
Black Music Mattered: Demystifying Segregation, Integration and the Sounds of Soul

Thursday, February 1, 4–5 p.m., 141 Allen Hall

2017 Pulitzer Prize winning photographer E. Jason Wambsgans is a staff photographer at the Chicago Tribune, where he has spent the last 15 years covering stories that have taken him from the vanishing rainforests of Madagascar to the war in Afghanistan, and the last 5 years intensively documenting the problem of Chicago’s gun violence.  Wambsgans studied fine art and cinema at Central Michigan University. Throughout a career of wide-ranging assignments, his editors have counted on his ability to inventively meet challenges, whether aesthetic, technical or conceptual, while gracefully conveying the human experience.

Wambsgans won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize Winner in Feature Photography, for what the judges observed was “a superb portrayal of a 10-year-old boy and his mother striving to put the boy’s life back together after he survived a shooting in Chicago.”

This talk explores his work in Chicago covering this important topic.

Demystifying: Documenting Chicago’s Persistent Gun Violence

Jason Wambsgans, Chicago Tribune and a 2017 SOJC Journalist in Residence
Demystifying: Documenting Chicago’s Persistent Gun Violence

Thursday, February 1, 4–5 p.m., 141 Allen Hall

2017 Pulitzer Prize winning photographer E. Jason Wambsgans is a staff photographer at the Chicago Tribune, where he has spent the last 15 years covering stories that have taken him from the vanishing rainforests of Madagascar to the war in Afghanistan, and the last 5 years intensively documenting the problem of Chicago’s gun violence.  Wambsgans studied fine art and cinema at Central Michigan University. Throughout a career of wide-ranging assignments, his editors have counted on his ability to inventively meet challenges, whether aesthetic, technical or conceptual, while gracefully conveying the human experience.

Wambsgans won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize Winner in Feature Photography, for what the judges observed was “a superb portrayal of a 10-year-old boy and his mother striving to put the boy’s life back together after he survived a shooting in Chicago.”

This talk explores his work in Chicago covering this important topic.

Demystifying Investigative Reporting’s Future: Stories by, through, and about algorithms

James T. Hamilton, Hearst Professor of Communication, Stanford University
Demystifying Investigative Reporting’s Future: Stories by, through, and about algorithms

Thursday, January 18, 4–5 p.m., 141 Allen Hall

Changes in media markets have put local investigative reporting particularly at risk. But new combinations of data and algorithms may make it easier for journalists to discover and tell the stories that hold institutions accountable. Based on his book Democracy’s Detectives: The Economics of Investigative Journalism,  Professor Hamilton explores how the future of accountability reporting will involve stories by, through, and about algorithms.

Dr. James Hamilton is the Hearst Professor of Communication, Director, of the Journalism Program and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Communication at Stanford University. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Hamilton taught at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy, where he directed the De Witt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy.

He earned a BA in Economics and Government (summa cum laude) and PhD in Economics from Harvard University.