Demystifying: How not to run with scissors: knowing and checking your data

Full lecture on iTunes Podcast on iTunes
Coming soon: Q&A
Coming soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview

Jennifer LaFleur, Investigative Reporting Workshop
Thursday, May 9, 4:00 p.m., Diamond Lake Room 119 EMU

Jennifer LaFleur is data editor for The Investigative Reporting Workshop. She also and teaches data journalism at American University.

Previously, LaFleur was a senior editor at Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, managing data journalists, investigative reporters and fellows. She also contributed to or edited dozens of major projects while at Reveal, one of which was a 2018 Pulitzer Prize finalist.

She is the former director of computer-assisted reporting at ProPublica and has held similar roles at The Dallas Morning News, the San Jose Mercury News and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. She is a former training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors and currently serves on the IRE Board of Directors.

She has won for her coverage of disability, legal and open government issues. She has trained thousands of journalists around the world in data journalism and investigative reporting.

Demystifying: How news organizations can fight misinformation by learning from the people who believe it and share it

Full lecture on iTunes Podcast on iTunes

Coming soon: Q&A
Coming soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview

Mandy Jenkins, John S. Knight Fellow, Stanford University
Thursday, May 2, 12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m., Room 150 Columbia Hall

Mandy Jenkins is currently a John. S. Knight Fellow at Stanford University. Prior to this, she was Head of News at Storyful, the leading social news and insights agency. Mandy managed a team of 60+ social journalists who worked with the world’s top newsrooms in surfacing, verifying and acquiring eyewitness journalism and debunking disinformation.

Before Storyful, she was part of the ground up teams at TBD.com and Digital First Media’s Project Thunderdome – both places where innovation and experimentation was built into the DNA. At the latter, she helped build and eventually manage a 45-person newsroom responsible for producing new products and creating engaging stories through experimental story forms, exceptional multimedia/interactive presentations and innovative data journalism. Earlier in her career, she was among the first social media editors for news while at the Cincinnati Enquirer.

She is also President of the Online News Association and sits on the board of directors for the American Society of News Editors. Follow Mandy on Twitter, LinkedIn and check out her website.

Demystifying: How Power and Privilege Shape Public Discourse in Progressive Communities

Full lecture on iTunes Q&A Podcast on iTunes

Coming soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview
Coming soon: Podcast Transcript

Sue Robinson, UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Demystifying: How Power and Privilege Shape Public Discourse in Progressive Communities

Thursday, April 25, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m., Room 150 Columbia Hall

Sue Robinson joined the faculty at UW-Madison’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication in January 2007 and now holds the Helen Firstbrook Franklin Professor of Journalism research chair. As a scholar, she explores how journalists and news organizations adopt new information communication technologies to report on public affairs in new forms and formats as well as how audiences and individuals can use the technologies for civic engagement. Central to her work is the consideration of information flow as it moves through specific media ecologies and networks at the local community level.

Her 2018 multi-phased, multi-method book (Networked News, Racial Divides: How Power & Privilege Shape Progressive Communities) researches how digital platforms enable and constrain citizens – especially those in marginalized communities – who produce and share information in the public sphere about racial achievement disparities in the K-12 education system. Using Bourdieu’s field theory as its theoretical framework, the book is meant to be a guide for journalists, politicians, activists and others on how to navigate information networks to improve public deliberation. Her talk will summarize some of the key lessons from this publication. She is currently at work on two additional book projects — one on Trump and the media with Matt Carlson and Seth Lewis, and one on media trust projects.

Demystifying: How climate change can be part of any beat

Full lecture on iTunes Q&A Podcast on iTunes

Coming soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview
Coming soon: Podcast Transcript

Rosalind Donald, Columbia University
Demystifying: How climate change can be part of any beat

Thursday, April 11, 12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m., Room 150 Columbia Hall

Rosalind Donald is a PhD candidate in Communications at Columbia University. She researches the community understanding of climate change in Miami, focusing on the way the city’s politics, infrastructure and environment influence the way climate change is interpreted in policy and the popular imagination. Alongside her research, she has also taught media studies methods and production at NYU. Before she moved to the U.S, she was deputy editor of Carbon Brief, a fact‐checking website focused on climate science and policy in the media.

In this talk, Ros will discuss how journalists in Miami are seeking to cover climate change in a way that brings in concerns like health, real estate, financial markets and social justice. She’ll discuss how to integrate climate change into health, business, real estate, arts and science/environment coverage, regardless of scientific expertise – and why it’s important.