Demystifying: Changing the Way We See Native America

Q&A Podcast on iTunesComing soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview

Matika Wilbur, Project 562 Founder
Demystifying: The Way We See Native America

Tuesday, November 20, 5:30-7:30 p.m., EMU Redwood Auditorium

Matika Wilbur earned her BFA from Brooks Institute of Photography where she double majored in Advertising and Digital Imaging. Based in the Pacific Northwest, Matika is the creator of Project 562, a photography project to photograph all the tribes in the United States:http://www.project562.com/

The initiative has taken Matika to over 300 tribal nations dispersed throughout 40 U.S. states where she has taken thousands of portraits, and collected hundreds of contemporary narratives from the breadth of Indian Country all in the pursuit of one goal: To Change The Way We See Native America.

Matika’s visit has been made possible due to a number of partners from across campus, including the BESeries, Native American Student Union and many others. One of our Native SOJC students, Mitchell Lira, has been instrumental in making this visit possible, with further support from Dean Molleda, Torsten Kjellstrand and Scott Maier.

An Evening with Tom Bowman

Coming soon: Full lecture
Q&A Podcast on iTunes KLCC 89.5 Interview
Coming soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview

Tom Bowman, Pentagon Reporter, NPR
An Evening with Tom Bowman

Wednesday, February 20, 7 p.m., Knight Library Browsing Room

Tom Bowman is a NPR National Desk reporter covering the Pentagon. In his current role, Bowman has traveled to Iraq and Afghanistan often for month-long visits and embedded with U.S. Marines and soldiers.

Before coming to NPR in April 2006, Bowman spent nine years as a Pentagon reporter at The Baltimore Sun. Altogether he was at The Sun for nearly two decades, covering the Maryland Statehouse, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the National Security Agency (NSA). His coverage of racial and gender discrimination at NSA led to a Pentagon investigation in 1994.

Bowman is a co-winner of a 2006 National Headliners’ Award for stories on the lack of advanced tourniquets for U.S. troops in Iraq. In 2010, he received an Edward R. Murrow Award for his coverage of a Taliban roadside bomb attack on an Army unit.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/tom-bowman-63a78a7/


This event is co-sponsored by KLCC

Demystifying: The music business as a petri dish for journalism innovation

Coming soon: Full lecture
Coming soon: Q&A
Podcast on iTunes
Coming soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview

Cherie Hu, Freelance Journalist
Demystifying: The music business as a petri dish for journalism innovation

Wednesday, February 27, 2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Room 221 Allen Hall
Thursday, February 28, 10 a.m. – 11:20 a.m., Room 303 Allen Hall

Cherie Hu is an award-winning freelance journalist focusing on the intersection of music, media and technology. She writes regular columns for Billboard, Forbes and Music Business Worldwide, with additional bylines in Variety, Pitchfork, Rolling Stone and the Columbia Journalism Review. She has spoken at over 25 conferences to date, including but not limited to SXSW, Midem, Music Biz and the Web Summit, and appears regularly as an expert commentator for the likes of CNBC and CGTN America. 

In 2017, at age 21, she received the Reeperbahn Festival’s inaugural award for Music Business Journalist of the Year. Previously, she spearheaded a research project on digital music innovation at Harvard Business School, and interned across product marketing, data analysis and artist development functions at music companies including Ticketmaster and Interscope Records.

Demystifying: Business Journalism in a Digital Age

Alice Bonasio, Editor-in-Chief, Tech Trends
Demystifying: Business Journalism in a Digital Age

Thursday, January 17, 12-1 p.m., Room 156 Straub Hall

Alice Bonasio is Editor-in-Chief for Tech Trends, a website “showcasing the latest disruptive technology that is changing the world we live, work, and play in.” 

Alongside her work at Tech Trends, Alice is also a VR (Virtual Reality) and Immersive Media consultant, and a contributor to publications such as Wired, Forbes, Fast Company, Quartz, VR Scout, Playboy, Scientific American, Ars Technica, The Next Web, and others.

In this talk, Alice will talk about her shifting career path, including reporting on business (as a journalist covering the tech sector) and making a business out of your reporting (building Tech Trends as a platform and monetizable brand), as well as the future of immersive storytelling and what that means for the next generation of communication professionals.

On her LinkedIn Profile, Alice describes her key interests as “Technology, VR, Mr, AR, Gaming, Lego, Digital Skills, Diversity.” She has a large international following for her work. Join her 44,000+ followers on Twitter, where she tweets as @alicebonasio

Demystifying: Why The Future of Journalism is Collaborative

Heather Bryant, Founder and director, Project Facet
Demystifying: Why The Future of Journalism is Collaborative

Thursday, October 25, 4–5 p.m., Room 141 Allen Hall

Heather Bryant is the founder and director of Project Facet, an open source infrastructure project that supports newsroom collaboration with tools to manage the logistics of creating, editing and distributing collaborative content, managing projects, facilitating collaborative relationships and sharing the best practices of collaborative journalism.

As a 2016-2017 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford, she researched how to make collaboration easier and more effective for newsrooms.

This year, she published the Collaborative Journalism Workbook and works with the Center for Cooperative Media to chronicle collaborative projects from around the world in the Collaborative Journalism Database. Her work includes managing the Collaborative Journalism Slack and doing trainings and workshops on effective, meaningful editorial collaboration.

Demystifying: Why ‘Solutions Journalism’ Matters

Full lecture Q&A Podcast on iTunesComing soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview

David Bornstein, CEO and co-founder, Solutions Journalism Network
Demystifying: Why ‘Solutions Journalism’ Matters

Thursday, April 19, 4–5 p.m., 141 Allen Hall

David Bornstein is CEO and co-founder of the Solutions Journalism Network, which works to establish the practice of solutions journalism — rigorous reporting that examines responses to social problems — as an integral part of mainstream news.

He has been a newspaper and magazine reporter for 25 years, having started his career working on the metro desk of New York Newsday. Since 2010, he has co-authored, with Tina Rosenberg, the “Fixes” column in The New York Times.

He is the author of three books: How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas (2003, Oxford University Press), The Price of a Dream: The Story of the Grameen Bank (1996, Simon & Schuster), and Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know (2010, Oxford University Press).

Demystifying: Reporting in Cuba, Mexico and Venezuela


Full lecture Q&A Podcast on iTunesComing soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview

Will Grant, Cuba correspondent, BBC (2018 Journalist in Residence)
Demystifying: Reporting in Cuba, Mexico and Venezuela

Thursday, May 3, 4–5 p.m., 141 Allen Hall

Will Grant is one of the UK’s leading broadcast journalists on Latin American affairs. He has been the BBC’s Correspondent in Cuba since late 2014, shortly before the announcement of the re-establishment of diplomatic ties with the United States. In that time he has covered such historic moments as President Obama’s ground-breaking visit to Cuba and the death of the founder of the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro.

Before taking up his role in Cuba, he was the BBC Correspondent in Venezuela under Hugo Chavez and Mexico / Central America during some of the most violent years of the drug war. Will was previously the Americas Editor at the BBC World Service Radio, based in London and Miami and has covered the region extensively for over twenty years.

In this talk, Grant will discuss being a journalist in Venezuela, Mexico and Cuba, three of the countries that have forged the biggest headlines in Latin America over the past decade.

Each country is different. Yet for reporters, there are certain similarities that can help us to produce informed, objective and balanced journalism in these fascinating nations. Whether dealing with political pressure from hostile authorities or having an awareness of personal security issues, understanding how to operate in the region can only strengthen the rich tradition of storytelling from Latin America as a whole.

Will Grant graduated with First Class Honours from Edinburgh University and gained his Masters degree from the University of London’s Institute of Latin American Studies.

Currently based in Havana, Will Grant will be a 2018 SOJC Journalist in Residence. He will be on campus: meeting with students and faculty Tuesday, May 1, through Friday, May 4.

Demystifying: How Journalists Can Rebuild Trust

Full lecture Q&A Podcast on iTunesComing soon: KWVA 88.1 Interview

Joy Mayer, Director of the Trusting News project
Demystifying: How Journalists Can Rebuild Trust

Thursday, May 17, 4–5 p.m., 141 Allen Hall

Joy Mayer is the director of The Trusting News project, which researches news consumers and then helps journalists earn trust and demonstrate credibility.

She is an adjunct faculty member at The Poynter Institute and the University of Florida and is a community engagement strategist based Sarasota, Florida.

She spent 12 years teaching at the Missouri School of Journalism, where she created an engagement curriculum and a community outreach team in the newsroom of the Columbia Missourian and also taught web design and print design.

Black Music Mattered: Demystifying Segregation, Integration and the Sounds of Soul

John Capouya, Associate Professor of journalism and writing at the University of Tampa
Black Music Mattered: Demystifying Segregation, Integration and the Sounds of Soul

Thursday, February 1, 4–5 p.m., 141 Allen Hall

Journalist and professor John Capouya, author of the newly published book, Florida Soul, will discuss the evolution of rhythm and blues music in black communities and on the ”chitlin’ circuit” in the era of segregation; the vital role soul played in the civil rights movement; and how artists like Sam & Dave, James Brown, Aretha Franklin and Sam Cooke crossed over the racial divide into the mainstream, changing American culture.

In his presentation he will show vintage images and play this classic music.

Demystifying: Documenting Chicago’s Persistent Gun Violence

Jason Wambsgans, Chicago Tribune and a 2017 SOJC Journalist in Residence
Demystifying: Documenting Chicago’s Persistent Gun Violence

Thursday, February 1, 4–5 p.m., 141 Allen Hall

2017 Pulitzer Prize winning photographer E. Jason Wambsgans is a staff photographer at the Chicago Tribune, where he has spent the last 15 years covering stories that have taken him from the vanishing rainforests of Madagascar to the war in Afghanistan, and the last 5 years intensively documenting the problem of Chicago’s gun violence.  Wambsgans studied fine art and cinema at Central Michigan University. Throughout a career of wide-ranging assignments, his editors have counted on his ability to inventively meet challenges, whether aesthetic, technical or conceptual, while gracefully conveying the human experience.

Wambsgans won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize Winner in Feature Photography, for what the judges observed was “a superb portrayal of a 10-year-old boy and his mother striving to put the boy’s life back together after he survived a shooting in Chicago.”

This talk explores his work in Chicago covering this important topic.